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Given the current situation, we understand that people may experience worry and even fear about how their disease and treatment may impact their personal risk. Sanofi Genzyme is committed to patient safety and to transparent communication. We are taking COVID-19 seriously, and we are committed to updating the communities we serve with relevant information related to our medicines to help inform health decisions.

As COVID-19 has emerged only recently, there are no available data regarding the impact of the virus on our current therapies. At this time, if you have general questions about our therapies, you should consult the current U.S. Prescribing Information (USPI).

Each patient’s situation is unique, and patients and their healthcare providers are in the best position to make decisions regarding their care. In addition to local public health authority guidance, and local guidance from medical or patient associations, more information about COVID-19 can be found on the Centers for Disease Control’s (CDC) website or the World Health Organization’s (WHO) website.

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LEMTRADA is a prescription medicine used to treat relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS), to include relapsing-remitting disease and active secondary progressive disease, in adults. Since treatment with LEMTRADA can increase your risk of getting certain conditions and diseases, LEMTRADA is generally prescribed for people who have tried 2 or more MS medicines that have not worked well enough. LEMTRADA is not recommended for use in patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS). It is not known if LEMTRADA is safe and effective for use in children under 17 years of age.

LEMTRADA is a prescription medicine used to treat relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS), to include relapsing-remitting disease and active secondary progressive disease, in adults. Since treatment with LEMTRADA can increase your risk of getting certain conditions and diseases, LEMTRADA is generally prescribed for people who have tried 2 or more MS medicines that have not worked well enough. LEMTRADA is not recommended for use in patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS). It is not known if LEMTRADA is safe and effective for use in children under 17 years of age.

EMBRACING SUPPORT
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KNOW WHERE TO FIND SUPPORT DURING YOUR RELAPSING MS TREATMENT

An article written by a LEMTRADA patient sharing how he handled talking to his employer about his relapsing MS

A SUPPORTIVE EMPLOYER CAN HELP WITH RELAPSING MS

By Donnie, Father, Husband, Project Leader, Former Athlete

One of the challenges for people with relapsing MS is talking to an employer about their condition. Some people may even choose not to share their diagnosis with the people at work. While I can totally understand that decision, that is not what I chose to do.

I have had the privilege of working for the same company for 25 years. Today, it’s the largest employer in the area with 650 employees; however, back when I started, it was still a growing company with a family-type atmosphere. In fact, I actually had four family members working there with me. So, about a year after being hired when I was first diagnosed with relapsing MS, I had no reservations about sharing the news with my employer and coworkers.

I worked there for quite a few years, and all of that time they were very understanding about my relapsing MS and how it affected me. But as my disease progressed, I knew I had to do something else. That’s when my neurologist and I decided on LEMTRADA. He told me that LEMTRADA is generally prescribed for adults with relapsing MS who have tried two or more MS medicines that didn’t work well enough, due to the serious side effects it can cause. Because of the way it is given—5 consecutive days of infusions in the first year—I figured I should let my employers know what was going on.

Prior to starting my first infusion course, I sat down with my supervisor to discuss the plan. It helped that the guy was not only my supervisor, but a coworker and friend for over 20 years. I shared with him most of the same information about LEMTRADA that I had received from my doctor.

I took a few days off before starting treatment to get some extra rest. I made sure to get all my pretreatments that my doctor prescribed, and then I took off the week of the infusion course. I followed my neurologist’s instructions and took some time to recover from the aches, pains, and fatigue that I had after the infusions. I knew those were going to be possibilities, so I used short-term disability for a few weeks to recharge my batteries. Remember, every person is different, so what may have worked best for me may not be best for someone else.

After about 1 year, I was ready for my second course, which was 3 consecutive days of infusions. I followed pretty much the same routine, including taking some short-term disability. And I know if I ever need another round of LEMTRADA treatment, it would occur at least a year after my previous round and also consist of 3 consecutive days of infusions.

At the end of my treatment, I went back to my normal routine and returned to work after I recovered from the infusions. I haven’t looked back since.

Donnie working at his computer

Not to say that a typical workday doesn’t have its challenges. For example, I usually walk around the office with the help of a cane because I work in a 200,000 square foot facility, and that’s a lot of ground to cover. Occasionally my job duties require me to move from one end of the facility to the other. Luckily, my employer was kind enough to provide a scooter to help me get around.

One of the things that I am most proud of is the close relationships that I’ve formed with my coworkers over 25 years. Many of them have known me since the time of my diagnosis, and they’ve seen how relapsing MS has affected me and what I’ve had to do to adjust.

On the other hand, there are a lot of newer folks that I work with now that only know me as the guy with the cane who speeds around the halls on his scooter. That’s what they see, but they don’t know my whole story.

Like I said, I could have chosen to keep most of this to myself. But I feel the more everyone knows about relapsing MS the better. No one really knows where it might crop up in their families, so having some knowledge can’t hurt. Also, I like to think that I’m doing a good thing to help everyone understand the valuable contributions we all make, despite our individual challenges.

It has been my experience that most people know very little about MS or the treatments. That’s why I never miss an opportunity to talk about my relapsing MS journey, and how the company that I work for has had my back throughout my LEMTRADA treatment.

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Important Safety Information See More

LEMTRADA can cause serious side effects including serious autoimmune problems. Some people receiving LEMTRADA develop a condition where the immune cells in your body attack other cells or organs in the body (autoimmunity), which can be serious and may cause death. Serious autoimmune problems may include: