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LEMTRADA is a prescription medicine used to treat adults with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). Because of its risks, LEMTRADA is generally used in people who have tried 2 or more MS medicines that have not worked well enough. It is not known if LEMTRADA is safe and effective for use in children under 17 years of age.

View IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Learn how LEMTRADA
performed IN CLINICAL STUDIES

LEMTRADA WAS STUDIED TO ASSESS

LEMTRADA RMS clinical study relapse information
LEMTRADA relapsing MS clinical study disability progression data

HOW LEMTRADA WAS STUDIED

TYPES OF INFORMATION COLLECTED

PRIMARY

Information that the study set out to do, learn, or prove based on the expected effects of the drug.

SECONDARY

Information that adds support and understanding to primary information.

TERTIARY

Tertiary or exploratory information may provide additional learnings about clinically important events that may be more closely examined in later studies.

  • No definitive conclusions about treatment effects with LEMTRADA or Rebif can be drawn from tertiary information

Is it possible for Lemtrada to reduce relapses?

STUDY 1: Primary
Information

At Year 2

People who took LEMTRADA had half as many relapses as people who took Rebif over 2 years. People who took LEMTRADA had half as many relapses as people who took Rebif over 2 years.

The rate of relapses per year for patients who took LEMTRADA was 0.26 vs 0.52 for patients who took Rebif.

STUDY 1: Secondary
Information

At Year 2

At Year 2: 65% of people who took LEMTRADA were relapse-free vs 47% of people who took Rebif

WHO TOOK LEMTRADA WERE RELAPSE-FREE VS 47% OF PATIENTS WHO TOOK REBIF

Years 3-6

THE ANNUAL PERCENTAGE
OF PATIENTS IN THE EXTENSION
STUDY WHO TOOK LEMTRADA
AND WERE FREE FROM RELAPSES

The annual percentage of people in the Extension Study who took LEMTRADA were free from relapse in Years 3-6 ranged from 79% to 87%

Is it possible for LEMTRADA to slow disability progression?

STUDY 1: Primary
Information

At Year 2

42% less likely to have confirmed disability progression vs Rebif at Year 2

13% of patients who took LEMTRADA experienced confirmed disability progression compared with 21% of those who took Rebif.

A separate study in patients showed no statistically significant difference in confirmed disability progression between LEMTRADA and Rebif.

Confirmed disability progression was defined as at least a 1-point increase (1.5 for patients starting at 0) on the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) that lasts for 6 months.

AT YEAR 2

At Year 2: 87% of people who took LEMTRADA had no confirmed disability progression vs 79% of people who took Rebif

WHO TOOK LEMTRADA HAD NO CONFIRMED DISABILITY PROGRESSION VS 79% OF PATIENTS WHO TOOK REBIF

AT YEAR 6

At Year 6: 72% of people who entered the Extension Study had no confirmed disability progression

WHO ENTERED THE EXTENSION STUDY HAD NO CONFIRMED DISABILITY PROGRESSION

STUDY 1: Tertiary
Information

These results were not tested for statistical significance. No definitive conclusions about treatment effects of LEMTRADA or Rebif can be drawn from these tertiary data from the LEMTRADA clinical trials.

AT YEAR 2, 85% of patients who took LEMTRADA had stabilized or improved disability vs 75% of patients who took Rebif.

LEMTRADA Rebif
28.8% Improved Disability 16.0%
55.9% Stabilized Disability 58.9%
15.3% Worsened Disability 25.1%

AT YEAR 6, 77% of patients who took LEMTRADA had stabilized or improved disability.

LEMTRADA
23.6% Improved Disability              
53.7% Stabilized Disability              
22.7% Worsened Disability              

IMPROVED DISABILITY

1-point or greater
decrease in EDSS score

STABILIZED DISABILITY

+ or - half-point or less
change in EDSS score

WORSENED DISABILITY

1-point or greater
increase in EDSS score

EDSS measures disability progression in people with MS on a scale of 0 to 10, where 0 represents no disability.